Testimonials

General Peter Phillips, former national President of the RSL and supporter of RaH. says in the film (Interview November 2013) : "There have been good efforts made to include all Australians in Anzac Day commemorations. But this is still the challenge. Indeed as we approach the centenary of Anzac, one of the most difficult tasks facing the committee set up by the last government to plan and oversee these commemorations is how to involve the over 40 percent of Australians who were either born overseas or are children of immigrants or refugees. Inclusiveness of Anzac commemorations is best driven on a local level instead of top down. Therefor I am so delighted what has gone on in Lismore with RaH. It's an amazing phenomenon."

General Peter Phillips, , former national President of the RSL, October 31, 2013
General Peter Phillips, former national President of the RSL and supporter of RaH. says in the film (Interview November 2013) : "There have been good efforts made to include all Australians in Anzac Day commemorations. But this is still the challenge. Indeed as we approach the centenary of Anzac, one of the most difficult tasks facing the committee set up by the last government to plan and oversee these commemorations is how to involve the over 40 ...more

General Peter Phillips, , former national President of the RSL, October 31, 2013
As Senior Australian of the Year for 2013, I applaud the efforts of Lismore Remembering and Healing to celebrate the International Day of Peace. I have agreed to be Patron of RaH, because I affirm your stand against all war. Attempts at military solutions to difficult situations and dangerous factions inevitably being misery and grief in their wake, and incite hatred and discrimination. Powerful countries justify a right to intervene in the problems of lesser States, but their own interests prevail. We have a duty as global citizens to strengthen and support Australia’s contribution to the international mechanisms for peaceful and thoughtful exchange that operate through the United Nations. At the same time, as citizens of Australia, we recognize within our own country the suffering and hurt that has affected those caught up in armed conflict anywhere. We acknowledge the past brutal treatment of our Aboriginal communities, and the many persons from other places whose lives have been soured and seared by war and who are now resident here with us. From whatever background, nation, creed or colour they come, any who have suffered through being forced or incited to engage in armed conflict deserve the right not to be abelled enemy or foe, but encouraged to join in acts of reconciliation and peace, to the end that we may live with each other in harmony, and that our nation may, within our region and throughout the world, pursue the paths of peace.

Patron of RaH: Emeritus Prof. Ian Maddocks, Senior Citizen of the Year 2013, September 21, 2013
As Senior Australian of the Year for 2013, I applaud the efforts of Lismore Remembering and Healing to celebrate the International Day of Peace. I have agreed to be Patron of RaH, because I affirm your stand against all war. Attempts at military solutions to difficult situations and dangerous factions inevitably being misery and grief in their wake, and incite hatred and discrimination. Powerful countries justify a right to intervene in the problems ...more

Patron of RaH: Emeritus Prof. Ian Maddocks, Senior Citizen of the Year 2013, September 21, 2013
As a Quaker with a Spiritual commitment to working towards a Peaceful world by nonviolence, RaH is a creative development in the work of Peace. It has grown organically from a concern to find peaceful ways of stopping armed conflict. RaH recognises the terrible consequences mentally and spiritually as well as physically for ordinary people of armed conflict, on combatants and non-combatants, whether in civil war or state endorsed conflict. The creativity in helping to heal the wounds is inspiring.

Ruth Haig. Kyogle, June 27, 2013
As a Quaker with a Spiritual commitment to working towards a Peaceful world by nonviolence, RaH is a creative development in the work of Peace. It has grown organically from a concern to find peaceful ways of stopping armed conflict. RaH recognises the terrible consequences mentally and spiritually as well as physically for ordinary people of armed conflict, on combatants and non-combatants, whether in civil war or state endorsed conflict. The creativity ...more

Ruth Haig. Kyogle, June 27, 2013
The passion of three committed women, driven to champion a positive narrative that emerges from the pain of war and violence, provides a beacon for all – those personally affected by war, and those who witness the despair more widely. It has been an extraordinary journey and a necessary voice for the community of Lismore. RaHOW speaks for peace. RaHOW speaks for hope. RaHOW speaks to encourage another way. RaHOW speaks for us all, that the legacy of the efforts of our forebears should be a lasting, and true to their conviction that the wounds of the world can be healed in a manner that respects human dignity. The garden bed is tilled, and the seeds are sewn. The gentle spirits that will their germination, so generously will us all to sprout and bloom in days of promise. RaHOW points us to the beauty of the garden.

Dr Michael Douglas, June 26, 2013
The passion of three committed women, driven to champion a positive narrative that emerges from the pain of war and violence, provides a beacon for all – those personally affected by war, and those who witness the despair more widely. It has been an extraordinary journey and a necessary voice for the community of Lismore. RaHOW speaks for peace. RaHOW speaks for hope. RaHOW speaks to encourage another way. RaHOW speaks for us all, that the ...more

Dr Michael Douglas, June 26, 2013
We are very fortunate that RaH originated in this area of the Far North Coast of NSW. To have a respectful and inclusive organisation that has peace as a predominant focus is very welcome. Like its predecessor the Living Library it may well become nationwide and continue to bring communities together. Thank you.

Pamela A. Ashton OAM, June 1, 2013
We are very fortunate that RaH originated in this area of the Far North Coast of NSW. To have a respectful and inclusive organisation that has peace as a predominant focus is very welcome. Like its predecessor the Living Library it may well become nationwide and continue to bring communities together. Thank you.

Pamela A. Ashton OAM, June 1, 2013
As the official Atheist I think RaH does a brilliant job in reaching out to all groups in the community to emphasise the universal human desire for peace and understanding. Understanding another's culture, values or belief puts us on the path to peace. Although I found it challenging to sit through the religious worship without jumping up to debate the efficacy of prayer, I recognised that was actually the point of the day ; sharing our differences and responding respectfully to hearts, as well as minds.

Angela Pollard, May 6, 2013
As the official Atheist I think RaH does a brilliant job in reaching out to all groups in the community to emphasise the universal human desire for peace and understanding. Understanding another's culture, values or belief puts us on the path to peace. Although I found it challenging to sit through the religious worship without jumping up to debate the efficacy of prayer, I recognised that was actually the point of the day ; sharing our differences ...more

Angela Pollard, May 6, 2013
While ANZAC Day is about commemorating those who gave their lives in the defence of Australia and the service of those who returned, it is appropriate to remember all those who have died in war, including our enemies, if we are to reinforce the lesson of the futility of war and renew our commitment to peace. In my experience, it is those who have been through the worst of war who are the first to acknowledge its folly.

Maj. General P. Phillips (1997 – 2003 National President RSL), May 6, 2013
While ANZAC Day is about commemorating those who gave their lives in the defence of Australia and the service of those who returned, it is appropriate to remember all those who have died in war, including our enemies, if we are to reinforce the lesson of the futility of war and renew our commitment to peace. In my experience, it is those who have been through the worst of war who are the first to acknowledge its folly.

Maj. General P. Phillips (1997 – 2003 National President RSL), May 6, 2013
I'm pleased to have been associated with Remembering and Healing since its inception. As a community, Lismore is committed to inclusion and harmony. Like many others, I'd like to see the whole world live in harmony too. For peace to truly reign, we must face the pain of past conflicts, help bodies, hearts and minds to heal, reach out in friendship and commit to a peaceful world. Through its ceremonies of remembrance and peace, RaH does just that. I thank them and support their continued efforts to bring harmony and peace to our region and beyond.

Lismore Mayor Jenny Dowell, May 1, 2013
I'm pleased to have been associated with Remembering and Healing since its inception. As a community, Lismore is committed to inclusion and harmony. Like many others, I'd like to see the whole world live in harmony too. For peace to truly reign, we must face the pain of past conflicts, help bodies, hearts and minds to heal, reach out in friendship and commit to a peaceful world. Through its ceremonies of remembrance and peace, RaH does just that. ...more

Lismore Mayor Jenny Dowell, May 1, 2013
It is always a profound experience to be involved in the music of the annual Remembering and Healing multifaith services. Over these past years, several choirs and and instrumentalists have added to the beauty of the service and added depth to its meaning. Music can symbolise the oneness we all share.

Deirdre Paillas, May 1, 2013
It is always a profound experience to be involved in the music of the annual Remembering and Healing multifaith services. Over these past years, several choirs and and instrumentalists have added to the beauty of the service and added depth to its meaning. Music can symbolise the oneness we all share.

Deirdre Paillas, May 1, 2013
Anzac Day was originally created by returned servicemen and the families of the fallen so as to give them an opportunity for a solemn event in which they could grieve. Families were robbed not only of their sons, brothers, fathers, and partners, but also of the opportunity for a burial service. Anzac Day provided this opportunity. It was not originally a glorious day of triumphant chest thumping, but a deeply sad commemorative event of a terrible tragedy which afflicted nearly every family on the planet. I believe that we owe it to those who suffered so much to never forget their pain. There are essential lessons to be learnt by history. It is up to us, the people, to ensure that forgetful politicians are never again able to throw away lives wastefully in their quest for power and infamy. Normal people, left to our own devices, do not want war and killing- and never have. History gives us permission to assert our right to live in peace and harmony with all those we share this planet with.

Dr James Alexander, May 1, 2013
Anzac Day was originally created by returned servicemen and the families of the fallen so as to give them an opportunity for a solemn event in which they could grieve. Families were robbed not only of their sons, brothers, fathers, and partners, but also of the opportunity for a burial service. Anzac Day provided this opportunity. It was not originally a glorious day of triumphant chest thumping, but a deeply sad commemorative event of a terrible ...more

Dr James Alexander, May 1, 2013